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Masala Omelet

masala omelet

Do you know that saying: there is more than one way to cook an omelet? OK, I think the saying is, more than one way to cook an egg. But oh well, the intended concept fits well surrounding the Masala Omelet.

I’ve read many recipes that include a number of spices in Masala omelet but I did not experience anything similar to that in Kerala India last summer. Another friend from Mangalore concurs this as true in her region as well.

chopped vegetables for masala omelet

Among the places we stayed, which hosted mainly people from India, the limited omelet spices I observed in the morning omelet preparation only included perhaps a bit of ground coriander, maybe a touch of red chili powder, salt, and pepper.

Fresh hot chilie peppers however, either greens and reds, oftentimes both, were always included, along with fresh chopped bell peppers, red onion, and chopped tomatoes with the seeds removed. 

long red hot chilies

Unlike the brunch omelet in the United States, patrons do not stroll through the omelet preparation line picking and choosing among various ingredients. Omelets are prepared with the same ingredients depending on the individual restaurant in Kerala and everyone receives the same omelet.

The Kerala cuisine is noted for its common use of coconut oil and thus foods are predominantly prepared using coconut oil, including the daily Masala omelet. 

A small amount of chopped fresh cilantro lightly speckled the omelets in the cooking preparation, with the finishing touch some lovely scented fresh bunched stems. Any place you flip it, a little spice and lots of colorful fresh veg and hot peppers is a delicious, flavorful way to begin the day.

Masala Omelet

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 5 minutes

Yield: 1

Masala Omelet

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2- 2 tablespoons coconut oil (other oils may be used)
  • 2 eggs, well beaten
  • 1 tablespoon red onion, chopped fine
  • 1 tablespoon red chili peppers with seeds, around 4-5 very thin slices (long hot green pepper may be used instead of the red chili or in combination with the red pepper)
  • 1 tablespoon red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon green pepper, chopped
  • 1-2 tablespoons plum tomato, seeded, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon fresh chopped cilantro
  • good pinch sea salt
  • pinch fresh black pepper
  • pinch ground coriander
  • pinch of red chili powder or flakes, optional
  • small stems fresh cilantro leaves for garnish

Instructions

  1. Heat omelet pan, add in coconut oil, swirling pan all around until melted and coated.
  2. Tumble the vegetables into the pan on low heat and cook for a couple minutes.
  3. Sprinkle in spices and cook around forty-five seconds.
  4. Stir in the chopped cilantro.
  5. Pour the beaten eggs all over the vegetable mixture in the pan.
  6. Using a spatula, stir the egg rapidly all around while cooking just until set.
  7. Flip the omelet to the other side or alternatively, just let the omelet cook lightly until set before sliding onto a plate.
  8. Arrange fresh chopped cilantro leaves on top and serve hot straight away.
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2 Comments

  1. MARY H HIRSCH
    Posted July 18, 2018 at 10:57 pm | Permalink

    Thank you for teaching me something I didn’t know. The only novelty, something I’ve never used, is the red chili pepper. This is perfect for a singles’ meal. Warm up the leftovers for a light supper or snack. It’s pretty also. I know you loved your trip to India.

    • Posted July 19, 2018 at 9:03 am | Permalink

      Hi Mary, I found this easy open face omelet delicious and it really is perfect for a light supper or snack as well as breakfast. Red chile peppers have a kick to them, popular with my kids (and me too!). It is pretty and fresh looking too, though I was curious on the’masala’ name since the limited combination of spices technically doesn’t create a ‘masala’ but it is what it is, a very tasty dish!

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  • Hi, I'm Peggy. Welcome to our Shared Table at Spiced Peach Blog!
    Subscribe here for my fresh, seasonal recipes with an international twist.